Words and Images from Ed Felker

Posts tagged “Spring Creek Outfitters

And Now a Word from our Sponsors…

I am very proud to announce this blog’s first paid advertisers! Welcome and a big THANK YOU to the following sponsors, whose ads are shown to the right. I encourage the readers of this blog to support these trusted businesses. Please click on the ads or the links below to learn more about them!

Eastern Trophies Fly Fishing. – Guided trips, instruction, beautiful flies or fly tying materials, William at Eastern Trophies has it all! Bookmark this site, you’ll be glad you did.

Dead Drift Flies – Josh Williams, veteran, outdoorsman, great fisherman, wonderful family man and he ties great flies too. I probably fish more with Dead Drift flies than any other!

Spring Creek Outfitters – If you long for a place where fly fishing is still a sport of solitude, the rivers of Western Maryland are where your wildest dreams become reality. And nobody knows these waters like Spring Creek’s Harold Harsh.

Rose River Farm – Western style fly fishing for trophy trout in Virginia and amazing, unique yurt-style luxury rental cabins, all set in wonderful, scenic Madison County, Virginia. One of my very favorite places in this beautiful state.

Visual Edge – Visual Edge is a full service landscape management company that can do it all. They’ll keep you looking good in the summer and they’ll clear the snow all winter long.

If you would like to advertise on Dispatches from the Potomac, email me and I’ll tell you how!

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The Bizarre and Exciting Snakehead Fish

snake1The Northern Snakehead Fish, subject of much discussion and debate among anglers and conservationists, seems here to stay. And while certainly invasive, the nightmare predicted by some who thought they would eat everything in the river doesn’t seem to be playing out. And in the middle section of the Potomac River, their numbers, size and fierce fight have attracted countless anglers. When my friend Kodi, who recently caught a 30-incher from his kayak, invited mutual friend and guide Harold Harsh of Spring Creek Outfitters and I to join him for some kayak largemouth bass and snakehead fishing, I had to go.

We went down the Maryland side to Mallows Bay and met at sunrise. At one point in the planning process I wondered if it would be easier for me to take the shorter drive down the Virginia side and just paddle across from Quantico. This picture shows what a stupid idea that was. The Potomac is wide where I live, maybe 800 yards or so. But down here, it’s got to be at least five miles across. I couldn’t understand how all the muddy water from the Upper Potomac from recent downpours wasn’t turning the Middle section just as brown. To quote the old Saturday Night Live skit about how the National Change Bank can make a profit just offering change for various denominations, “The answer? Volume.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Harold, one of the best people you’ll ever meet. I met Harold many years ago when I first started fly fishing and booked a float with him on the North Branch of the Potomac. It’s worth noting that the farthest upstream and the farthest downstream I have fished the waters of the Potomac (over 200 miles between), I fished both with Harold.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe picture above looking out past the shipwreck across to Virginia is out in the main stem of the river. Mallows Bay looks more like this, with weeds and grasses providing lots of cover for bass and snakehead. It’s tidal here, so at low tide normally the fish that seek cover in the taller weeds you see here get forced back into a position where they are more exposed and, presumably, easier to catch. But the rain pushed the water levels up a bit. For whatever reason, the fishing was extremely tough.

My very first Snakehead encounter happened in a little cove. You see Harold’s kayak in the distance, he’s at the opening of the cove there. I was paddling quietly back there in maybe twelve inches of water, the bottom eleven of which was all grass or Hydrilla or whatever it is. I heard a noise to my left and saw large, black fins weaving and splashing between the tall weeds. Snakehead. I threw the popper tight against the weeds but could not entice him out. When I had exhausted that option, I decided to paddle over and just see if I could get a closer look. I drifted silently to the weeds, peering over the edge of my kayak, looking for movement. Then the water exploded next to me in a violent burst as the Snakehead bolted to safety. Not gonna lie here, it scared the shit out of me. But I immediately knew I just had to get one of those fish on my line!

snake3The fishing did not improve. Harold caught a decent largemouth and hooked a Snakehead but lost it. And I missed a few bass and that was it. So we left Mallows Bay and headed to a pond that Kodi knew about which held a lot of Snakehead. It was a little tricky too, as you had to cast out beyond the lily pads, which left you very little room to strip in a top water fly before you had to pick it up and recast. But I got lucky and fooled this little one right as my fly reached the lily pads. People asked me how the fight was. He was overmatched with my 7-weight Sage, and I had to basically horse him over the pads, if he went down in there I never could have gotten him out. Even a small one, though, is pretty intimidating. Slimy, more beautiful in color and more hideous in form than I expected. They look equal parts ancient, evil and angry.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI don’t keep fish, ever. But they want you to kill all the Snakeheads you catch, and 100% of the people I know who have tried it say it’s delicious, so I look forward to trying this soon.

snake4It was a tiring day of not catching many fish in the hot sun, but it is always a pleasure to be among good friends, and the challenge of catching fish who don’t want to be caught is a character builder. Sometimes the fish win. Regardless, if you’re only going to catch one fish all day, let it be something new and exciting!


Common Bonds

IMG_0087From left to right: I met Matt many years ago when he showed up at a party at my house with a mutual acquaintance. He spotted a picture on our fridge of me with a Steelhead and we got to talking fly fishing. A few weeks later we were on a road trip together to upstate New York to fish for salmon and we remain great friends and fishing buddies. Harold, who runs the guide service Spring Creek Outfitters out of Western Maryland, was the first guide I ever fished with when I started fly fishing. Since then we have become friends through his generous work with Project Healing Waters. I first met Joel when a mutual online friend introduced us because Joel needed a fly fishing related logo design. We became fast friends, and his Missoula, Montana-based guide business Montana Troutaholics is an absolute must if you are planning a trip to that area to fish.

IMG_0025So myself and three friends I met because of fly fishing but who have never met each other, came together because of that shared passion for fly fishing at one of the best places for it, Rose River Farm.

IMG_0001The morning was fairly cold, and the fish were sluggish early on.

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But I was fishing with two of the best trout guides I know, so I was positive it was just a matter of time.

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In the afternoon, with just a hint of sun to warm the water a couple of degrees, things turned on and the fish became a lot more active.

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There was a little beer drinking going on as well, of course.

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Matt and Joel warming up by the grill before lunch.

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A hot lunch hit the spot after spending the cold morning in the water.

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Here’s Harold putting the bamboo to the test on a nice rainbow.

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And back you go into the Rose River.

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My biggest fish of the day.

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I think it’s safe to say the Rose was pretty clear!

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Joel always looks like he’s in a Simm’s ad or catalog cover.

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A full day of fishing behind us and more weekend adventures ahead for Joel and I, we all headed back to the wonderful luxury yurt-style cabin at Rose River Farm. More beer and many laughs went great with a few thick rib-eye steaks on the grill. A perfect end to a great day.

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Hanging around the fire pit was so much fun. There was weather coming in, but luckily it held off long enough.

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We were surprised the next morning to find a couple inches of fresh, wet snow on the ground!

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An unhurried, hearty breakfast started our day off right.

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I don’t drink coffee, but on this morning I could have used a cup or two!

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After breakfast, Joel and I headed into the Shenandoah National Park for some brook trout fishing and a vigorous hike. We stopped at a few pools along the way, but the fishing was pretty tough, quite possibly the result of the weather front that had just moved through.

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But Joel would not be discouraged! We tried many different flies to get the attention of these stubborn fish.

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Finally patience and skill paid off as Joel brought this little beauty to hand. Joel’s first native brookie, and also by far his farthest easterly fish caught in the U.S. So while not big, it was memorable.

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When we let this little guy go, we told him to tell all his friends that he was treated with care and respect and that the fly was delicious. But they didn’t get the message, this was the only fish of the day. I was psyched Joel got it though, and the company and great hike made for a fantastic day despite the fishing.

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This is my favorite photo of the day, and I encourage you to click on it to see it larger. Joel stepped off the path to try one more spot on the hike back, and I captured this cool panorama with my iPhone. Winter has its own brand of beauty, and while at first glance it can look pretty brown and dull outside, nature reveals wonderful, subtle colors in the winter. Sometimes we have to just remember to open our eyes and maybe look a little harder.

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The next day brought another opportunity to share with Joel, who has never been out this way, something that’s very special to me: A hike with Team Orange (my two Wirehaired Vizslas). I chose the more difficult trail at Maryland Heights, which has some neat Civil War history along the way.

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Another iPhone panorama from the summit, showing the historic town of Harper’s Ferry, WV, and the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers.

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A mellow evening after a fun filled weekend was in order, beginning with a final beverage on the Platform.

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The sun sets on the last day of Joel’s visit. I’m so grateful to have my friends together for some fishing down at Rose River Farm, and for the chance to spend some more time with Joel, he and his wife Debbie have been such gracious hosts to me when I’ve visited out west.

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Everyone was a bit tired after three days of fishing, hiking and drinking. So some couch time was what we were in the mood for, and Finn wasn’t going to let his new hiking buddy get too far away.